The Story of Squanto - a Little Known Thanksgiving Hero


In the early 1600s, the Wampanoag (Wam-pa-NO-ag) Indians covered the coast of what we now call New England. They raised crops, living close to the ocean in summer for seafood, moving inland in winter to set up hunting camps. Their encounters with Europeans over the years were mostly friendly.
One exception: In 1614 Captain Thomas Hunt captured several Wampanoag, along with a Patuxet named Squanto, to be sold into slavery in Spain. A Spanish monk purchased Squanto's freedom, taught him English, and introduced him to Jesus Christ. In 1619, Squanto returned to his native land, only to find his tribe wiped out by an epidemic. Thereafter he made his home with the Wampanoag.
Meanwhile, in 1608, a British group called the Separatists fled to Leyden, Holland. There they found religious freedom, but also poverty, grueling work hours and a secular culture that threatened to undo the values they had carefully instilled into their children. In 1620, they sold everything and indentured themselves for seven years to finance their journey to America.
On the Mayflower, the Separatists were joined by those seeking the new land for other reasons; these they called the Strangers. The two groups, 102 altogether, were called the Pilgrims.
Their journey lasted nine weeks. In one of those "accidents" which change the course of history, the ship lost its course and landed far north of its destination at what we now call Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Once outside the territory covered by the King's Charter, the Pilgrims became responsible for their own government, and so they wrote a set of laws called The Mayflower Compact.
On December 21, 1620, they began their new life at the place they named Plymouth.
It was a devastating winter -- whipped with wind and sleet and snow. Half the Pilgrims died. Still the Separatists clung to their faith; not one chose to return to England with the Mayflower that spring.
But spring brought unexpected relief w the help of a noble and generous Christian brother -- Squanto. He taught them how to grow corn, use fertilizer, stalk deer and catch fish. William Bradford, the governor of Plymouth, wrote of Squanto that he was "a special instrument sent of God for good beyond their expectations."
And so their first harvest was good. Governor Bradford proclaimed a day of thanksgiving to God and the Pilgrims invited their Indian friends. Chief Massasoit and 90 members of his tribe came, along with Squanto, bearing venison and wild turkeys for all to share. Together in harmony, the Pilgrims and the Indians feasted, played games, ran races and showed their prowess with bow and arrow and musket.
How thankful were the Pilgrims? The first Thanksgiving took three whole days!

What to do when you are Offended







Remember these things next time you feel offended:

1. Never, ever withdraw. No matter how hurt you are
2. 9 times out of 10 we simply misunderstood what was said and didn't see the heart behind what was said
3. Always wait 24 hours before you answer a matter
4. People say hurtful things because they are hurting themselves.
5. Never take things personally, ever. It's not about you. You just happened to be in the path of a bitter person.
6. Take criticism with a smile.
7. Do not give an offended person a platform to speak their mind. They will only infect others. Speak privately with them.
8. When you are offended it is a tell-tale fact that a part of your flesh is still dominating your soul without the Cross. Only the self-centered old sin nature can get offended.
9. When you're tired, hurting or in pain you most likely are the most vulnerable to be offended.
10. Even though it was said in a hurtful way or improperly, ask yourself this question "was it true what they said" and if so deal with it alone with God.

When we get offended, no matter the circumstance, we can know for sure that the symptom of offense that we feel is a sure sign we have uncrucified flesh reigning somewhere in our soul.

If  the Word of God offends us agree with it quickly - Jesus spoke beforehand that his disciples would have Divine Definition so that when offense came they would not be scandalized. Matthew 5:25-26 "Agree with thine adversary quickly, while thou art in the way with him; lest at any time the adversary deliver thee to the judge, and the judge deliver thee to the officer, and thou be cast into prison. Verily I say unto thee, Thou shalt by no means come out thence, till thou hast paid the uttermost farthing"

Psalms 119:165
Great peace have they which love thy law:and nothing shall offend them.

Matthew 24:10
And then many will be offended and repelled and will begin to distrust and desert [Him Whom they ought to trust and obey] and will stumble and fall away and betray one another and pursue one another with hatred.

Proverbs 18:19
A brother offended is harder to be won than a strong city:and their contentions are like the bars of a castle.

Matthew 11:6
And blessed is he, whosoever shall not be offended in me.

Matthew 15:12-14
Then came his disciples, and said unto him, Knowest thou that the Pharisees were offended, after they heard this saying?
But he answered and said, Every plant, which my heavenly Father hath not planted, shall be rooted up.
Let them alone:they be blind leaders of the blind. And if the blind lead the blind, both shall fall into the ditch.

Matthew 26:31-35
Prediction About Peter’s Denial
(Mark 14:27- 31; Luke 22:31- 34; John 13:36- 38)
Then saith Jesus unto them, All ye shall be offended because of me this night:for it is written, I will smite the shepherd, and the sheep of the flock shall be scattered abroad.
But after I am risen again, I will go before you into Galilee.
-- Peter answered and said unto him, Though all men shall be offended because of thee, yet will I never be offended.
Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, That this night, before the cock crow, thou shalt deny me thrice.
Peter said unto him, Though I should die with thee, yet will I not deny thee. Likewise also said all the disciples.

Mark 4:17
And have no root in themselves, and so endure but for a time:afterward, when affliction or persecution ariseth for the word’s sake, immediately they are offended.

Mark 6:3
Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary, the brother of James, and Joses, and of Juda, and Simon? and are not his sisters here with us? And they were offended at him.

John 16:1
These things have I spoken unto you, that ye should not be offended.

2 Corinthians 11:29
Who is weak, and I am not weak? who is offended, and I burn not?

John 6:65-68
And he said, Therefore said I unto you, that no man can come unto me, except it were given unto him of my Father.
From that time many of his disciples went back, and walked no more with him.
Then said Jesus unto the twelve, Will -- ye also go away?
Then Simon Peter answered him, Lord, to whom shall we go? thou hast the words of eternal life.

Rom 5.5 the love of God sheds abroad in our hearts
Self love is easily wounded. It is so geared to its own self and self consciousness and is not easily healed. Overly occupied with myself everyday and how much I should be loved, valued and needed. Cain was wounded hurt, offended and never healed.
We have to leave ourselves to discover this love. Love one another as I have loved you.



This Lent Season Consider - Persecution of Christians has Exponentially Increased in this Century


This morning I read an article by a Catholic writer George Weigel on Christian Persecution in the 20th century. It has been estimated by some Catholic circles that over 150,000 brother's & sisters have perished for their faith. The number is most probably higher. 

With the increasing influx of radicals in Syria, Africa, and the heavy hand of governments in North Korea, Iran, and the Middle East; many, many have lost their lives for naming the Name of Christ. In Matthew 24 we see in the Last Days persecution will exponentiate - and we see that today.


Hebrews 13.3 writes "Remember them that are in bonds, as bound with them; and them which suffer adversity, as being yourselves also in the body" 

I remember a statement by Richard Wurmbrand when I heard him speak as a kid at a conference on the Persecuted Church that while he spent those 14 years tortured for his faith in a communist prison there were times that angels would come an visit him and minister to him. Once he was told by an angel that they were there because the free church was praying for him in bonds.

I'd like to share a few excerpts from George Weigel's article  on persecution:
"We have been living, and we’re living now, in the greatest era of persecution in Christian history. More Christians died for the faith in the twentieth century than in the previous nineteen centuries of Christian history combined. And while the character of the persecutors has changed, from the lethal heyday of the twentieth-century totalitarianisms to the first decades of the twenty-first century, the assault on the Christian faithful today is ongoing, extensive, and heart-rending. Solidarity with the persecuted Church is an obligation of Christian faith."


Where it is happening:

(image courtesy of Open Doors)
Today when Christians get upset that they have to wait in line for their favorite Starbucks' drink or they get depressed because no one likes what they write on Facebook - they need to remember their brothers and sisters who have lost family, homes, all their belongings for the sake of the Gospel. One writer put it this way; Christians in the west need a good lesson on "Sufferology" - how to suffer well for the true treasure, gold tried in the fire. 

Mark Moore writes: "163,000 Christians die every year for their faith. Half of all the Christians who have ever died for their faith did so in this century alone, some 35 million" Read Mark Moore's essay on statistics of the persecuted church and how you can help. Also read websites like: Open Door's and Voice of the Martyrs to be educated and updated how you can pray.

This season of Lent is coming upon us - let's not focus on what we have to give up for God for Lent but what our brothers and sisters have lost for Christ's sake and that we remember them in prayer.